October 29

global goal #8 decent work and economic growth.

Decent work and economic growth means. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all.  With these targets in mind, the goal is to achieve full and productive employment, and decent work, for all women and men by 2030.

 

 

By: Madix

What do you guys think? please go check out the rest of my blog and my classmates and leave some comments. Thank you.

October 29

quality education

Quality education is important in the world a lot of people in our world are not educated. This is a problem when people are able to get quality education they can break from the cycle of poverty. Education therefore helps to reduce inequalities and to reach gender equality. If the all the people in the world it can prevent other global goals too. what this means global goal 4 quality education means to digital education technologies improves fundamental skills such as collaboration, problem solving and global awareness. What is a good Quality Education a good quality education is one that provides all learners with capabilities they require to become economically productive, develop sustainable livelihoods, contribute to peaceful and democratic societies and enhance individual well-being.

 

 

By: Madix

What do you guys think? please go check out the rest of my blog and my classmates and leave some comments. Thank you.

October 29

Affordable and clean energy.

Affordable and clean energy is really important in the world today. With Affordable and clean energy we can have heated homes and cars to get to places in. Affordable and clean energy means investing in clean energy sources such as solar, wind and thermal.

 

What do you guys think? also please go check out my classmates and I’s blogs and leave a comment. Thank You.

 

By: Madix

October 29

Explain IN DETAIL global goal 3: Good Health and Well Being. What does it mean? Why is it important?

Global goal #3 good health and well being means that everyone in the world should all have good health. because some people in our world do not have good health and they have to pay a lot of money once in a while and maybe they don’t have good insurance and they can’t cover it. so in the world if we can solve this goal a lot of people in the world won’t have to pay money every once in a while.

 

By: Madix

 

What do you guys think? please go visit my classmates blogs and leave some comments.

October 29

Explain IN DETAIL global goal 2: Zero Hunger. What does it mean? Why is it important?

Global Goal 2: Zero Hunger means that a lot of people in the world have no food to feed them and they can’t afford food for them the world is trying to get food to those people. This goal is important because if everyone in the world has food then we won’t have to worry about people starving or making extra food to send over to places were they need food.

 

By: Madix

 

What do you guys think?

October 29

clean water and sanitation

What can people do to make a difference on clean water and sanitation? People in other countries need clean water to drink these countries are Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Chad, Cambodia,Laos, Haiti, Ghana, India, Rwanda, Bangladesh. All of these don’t have clean water to drink we need to do something about it. Here are a couple ways we can provide clean water and sanitation for nine billion people. 1 We need a better accounting of our water in many places we don’t have any idea how current and near-term future demand matches up with the available surface and groundwater supplies. 2 Although the Swiss are quite efficient at using water within our country we have a huge water footprint because of all the food and goods we import often from very water stressed parts of the world. Globalisation means there is a global water economy at play. 3  Currently those who work on water services think almost exclusively in terms of access and those who work on water resources think in terms of sectors and water usage. I think the water service people need to think harder about where the water for increasing coverage is going to come from and how we can best implement sanitation services that protect water resources. 4 For a long time we treated water as limitless, and the incentive structures in cities and rural areas pushed people towards unsustainable practices. Water distribution being highly subsidised by governments doesn’t help create awareness about its actual value. We must make measurable efforts to change water-use habits in a global scale. 5  For developing countries this may feel like a hard task, but governments do this sort of thing for education, energy, and other sectors. It’s high time to do the same for water. Betsy Otto. 5 To secure a safe water supply for the poorest people service providers should get into trouble when they fail to provide the services the poorest need. 6 In places like Sierra Leone, Liberia and Tanzania, more than 15 to 20 percent of water points fail in the first year after construction. Poor communities often have to contribute a great deal for a new water point. 7 This could of course be prevented if there is an effort to invest in simple but efficient technologies for irrigation.

              By: Madix

 

What do you guys think?

October 29

clean water and sanitation

What can people do to make a difference on clean water and sanitation? People in other countries need clean water to drink these countries are Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Chad, Cambodia,Laos, Haiti, Ghana, India, Rwanda, Bangladesh. All of these don’t have clean water to drink we need to do something about it. Here are a couple ways we can provide clean water and sanitation for nine billion people. 1 We need a better accounting of our “water balance sheet”. In many places, we don’t have any idea how current and near-term future demand matches up with the available surface and groundwater supplies. The WRI’s Aqueduct tool has a water supply/demand indicator – called “baseline water stress” – that gives a good preliminary read on whether local water use is sustainable or not. Betsy Otto, global director – water programme, World Resources Institute, Washington DC, US, @wriaqueduct. 2 Although the Swiss are quite efficient at using water within our country, we have a huge water footprint because of all the food and goods we import, often from very water stressed parts of the world. Globalisation means there is a global water economy at play. Government regulation or taxation could nudge behaviours onto a more sustainable path. Sean Furey, water and sanitation specialist, Skat, St Gallen, Switzerland, @thewatercyclist. 3  Currently, those who work on “water services” think almost exclusively in terms of access, and those who work on “water resources” think in terms of sectors and water usage. I think the water service people (myself included) need to think harder about where the water for increasing coverage is going to come from, and how we can best implement sanitation services that protect water resources. Sophie Trémolet, director, Trémolet Consulting, London, United Kingdom, @stremolet. 4 For a long time we treated water as limitless, and the incentive structures in cities and rural areas pushed people towards unsustainable practices. Water distribution being highly subsidised by governments doesn’t help create awareness about its actual value. We must make measurable efforts to change water-use habits in a global scale. Carlos Hurtado Aguilar, manager – sustainable development of water resources, FEMSA Foundation, Monterrey, Mexico. 5  Governments can provide both regulatory sideboards – such as requirements for full cost recovery on water tariffs – and incentives – such as cost-share on water reuse and rainwater harvesting systems. For developing countries (and many developed countries) this may feel like a daunting task, but governments do this sort of thing for education, energy, and other sectors. It’s high time to do the same for water. Betsy Otto. 5 To secure a safe water supply for the poorest people, service providers should get into trouble when they fail to provide the services the poorest need. There should be cross-subsidies between the rich and the poor but most importantly cross-subsidies that work in reverse should be eliminated. With the money saved, direct subsidies can be given to the poor. We should also encourage the poorest people to be more self-reliant (e.g. encourage rainwater harvesting practices) and to demand good quality services as customers. Sophie Trémolet. 6 I’ve been looking at water point data in various countries and the number of boreholes and wells that are reported dry or seasonal only is shocking. In places like Sierra Leone, Liberia and Tanzania, more than 15 to 20% of water points fail in the first year after construction. That’s why we are working with Wateraid and Unicef to improve water well drilling practices. Poor communities often have to contribute a great deal for a new water point, so it clearly isn’t right when they are left with a dud. Sean Furey. 7 Some means of beating water scarcity in agriculture – for example, farming close to rivers – are cheap but unsustainable. This could of course be prevented if there is an effort to invest in simple but efficient technologies for irrigation. This would break the vicious cycle where water scarcity leads to the invasion of marginal lands near rivers, which in turn undermines the ability of the river system to replenish its water resources, leading to further scarcity. Greenwell Matchaya, researcher and economist, International Water Management Institute, Pretoria, South Africa, @IWMI_.

 

              By: Madix

 

What do you guys think? If you want to find more information check out The Guardian link is below.  

 

https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2015/jul/14/water-sanitation-scarcity-population-growth-summary.

 

I got all my info from The Guardian. Go check it out.

October 10

Clean water and Sanitation

What can people do to make a difference on clean water and sanitation? People in other countries need clean water to drink these countries are Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Chad, Cambodia,Laos, Haiti, Ghana, India, Rwanda, Bangladesh. All of these don’t have clean water to drink we need to do something about it. Here are a couple ways we can provide clean water and sanitation for nine billion people. 1 We need a better accounting of our “water balance sheet”. In many places, we don’t have any idea how current and near-term future demand matches up with the available surface and groundwater supplies. The WRI’s Aqueduct tool has a water supply/demand indicator – called “baseline water stress” – that gives a good preliminary read on whether local water use is sustainable or not. Betsy Otto, global director – water programme, World Resources Institute, Washington DC, US, @wriaqueduct. 2 Although the Swiss are quite efficient at using water within our country, we have a huge water footprint because of all the food and goods we import, often from very water stressed parts of the world. Globalisation means there is a global water economy at play. Government regulation or taxation could nudge behaviours onto a more sustainable path. Sean Furey, water and sanitation specialist, Skat, St Gallen, Switzerland, @thewatercyclist. 3  Currently, those who work on “water services” think almost exclusively in terms of access, and those who work on “water resources” think in terms of sectors and water usage. I think the water service people (myself included) need to think harder about where the water for increasing coverage is going to come from, and how we can best implement sanitation services that protect water resources. Sophie Trémolet, director, Trémolet Consulting, London, United Kingdom, @stremolet. 4 For a long time we treated water as limitless, and the incentive structures in cities and rural areas pushed people towards unsustainable practices. Water distribution being highly subsidised by governments doesn’t help create awareness about its actual value. We must make measurable efforts to change water-use habits in a global scale. Carlos Hurtado Aguilar, manager – sustainable development of water resources, FEMSA Foundation, Monterrey, Mexico. 5  Governments can provide both regulatory sideboards – such as requirements for full cost recovery on water tariffs – and incentives – such as cost-share on water reuse and rainwater harvesting systems. For developing countries (and many developed countries) this may feel like a daunting task, but governments do this sort of thing for education, energy, and other sectors. It’s high time to do the same for water. Betsy Otto.

 

              By: Madix

 

What do you guys think? If you want to find more information check out The Guardian link is below.  

 

https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2015/jul/14/water-sanitation-scarcity-population-growth-summary.

 

I got all my info from The Guardian. Go check it out.

 

Please go check out more on my blog and my classmates remember leave some comments.

October 8

what it means to be a responsible consumer

I think that being a responsible consumer is really important in many ways. Here are three ways you can be a responsible consumer and help to achieve these goals by 2030.

  1. Eat all that you get don’t throw any food into the trash ask someone if they want it.
  2. Throwing trash out in the right place can help a lot too, but throwing it out anywhere can really harm the environment.
  3. Recycling stuff can be a big help in the environment like paper so we don’t have to keep cutting trees down.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           please lets do something about this goals and lets try to achieve them.                                                                       

Image result for global goals      By: Madix